Author: Taema

Hundreds of sharks feast on a giant shoal of fish [VIDEO]

This quite extraordinary natural event was filmed and photographed by Sean Scott, a landscape photographer who was filming with a drone a group of people swimming. Several sharks are then seen getting real close to them but avoiding them at the last moment. The scene was occurring in Red Bluff, West Australia just a few days ago. Then, what happened to finally be a large pack of hundreds of sharks began to converge and feast on a huge shoal of small fishes, looking from the drone’s view like living black ink evolving underwater, a few feet only from the...

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Cultural power to fight against climate change?

Yesterday, Marae Taputapuatea in Raiatea, French Polynesia as well as the Sacred Island of Okinoshima and Associated Sites in the Munakata in Japan have been integrated in the list of World Cultural Heritage sites. If you want to learn more about Marae Taputapuatea, check this article we published yesterday. Concerning the Sacred Island of Okinoshima, UNESCO describes this site as “an exceptional example of the tradition of worship of a sacred island. The archaeological sites that have been preserved on the Island are virtually intact, and provide a chronological record of how the rituals performed there changed from the 4th to the 9th centuries...

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The world recognizes Polynesian cultural heritage & it was damn time!

Better late than ever, the ancient Polynesian roofless temple or “marae” of Tapuatea has eventually been integrated to the list of the World Heritage Sites in Oceania today. Since the inscription of Easter Island and its giant statues in 1995, the region hasn’t succeeded in obtaining much of the focus of UNESCO until these last years, more precisely since The Pacific 2009 Programme (2000-2009). According to unesco.org, the latter  “was elaborated through several regional consultations and the 31st session of the World Heritage Committee Meeting was held in Christchurch in 2007 under the chairmanship of Mr. Te Heuheu, Paramount...

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In Tahiti, life’s really a beach!

Undoubtedly, life is really easy going in Tahiti, French Polynesia. As the old native saying goes “haere maru, haere papu”, which means “slowly but surely”. You will get a glimpse of this specially relaxed Pacifican way of life with the slideshow below…...

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New Zealand’s lost 8th World Wonder spotted!

A series of scientific studies on Lake Rotomahana, in Aotearoa (NZ), since 2011, have found evidence of remains of the legendary Pink and White Terraces, a natural wonder which was well know by locals and visited by adventurers from all around the world until 1886. Poetically named Te Otukapuarangi in Māori, which means “The fountain of the clouded sky”, it was renowned worldwide. It consisted of a series of natural pools, stepping down from a hill. They were formed by geothermal hot springs flowing downhill, ending their course in lake Rotomahana below. This out of this world landscape, which was...

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Flying high over Tahitian lagoon

A glimpse of the Pacifican lifestyle, first time gliding, for the author, Taema, over the beautiful landscapes of Tahiti ! It was my first paragliding experience. It was in Punaauia, Tahiti, French Polynesia. It was a beautiful morning. I had just received this paragliding session as a gift from my sister the evening before. She did it on purpose so I wouldn’t have too much time to worry, and would just have to do it the next day. I was a bit stressed, but managed to sleep without problems. The fateful day arrived quickly and not before long, I...

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Hawaiki Nui Va’a International race back in november

The great Polynesian canoe race, Hawaiki Nui Va’a, is coming back at the end of the year. Born in 1992, from the dream of Edouard Maamaatuaiahutapu and his friends, this International Sporting Event was inspired to its creators by the natural majesty of the islands where they lived and by the traditions of their ancestors. This last idea is clearly illustrated by the name of the race, which borrows the ancient name of the island of Raiatea : Hawaiki Nui. It is believed to have been, in pre-european times, the origin of the great Polynesian migrations towards all the lands of...

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The Polynesian god of war conquers the UN

In ancient times, Polynesians sacrificed defeated warriors on his sacred grounds. Oro, the mythical god of war has the mana, even nowadays, to conquer the UN… at least the UNESCO committee. Better late than ever, The United Nations will soon have the occasion to fix one of its major oversight in Oceania. The center of ancient Polynesian civilisation, Marae Taputapuatea, dedicated to Oro, is on its way to enter the World heritage list in a few days, the 8th and 9th July. Even if the final decision will be made by the UNESCO committee, it should only be positive,...

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Hawaii welcomes Hokule’a back home

The conclusion of the 40,000 nautical miles around “island earth” of the double-hulled Hawaiian canoe, Hokule’a, has finally arrived to its final destination, coming back to its original Homeland, into Ala Moana Beach Park on Saturday, according to radio New Zealand. Joyful crowds were present to welcome back the seafarers, after their long journey, navigating mostly in the traditional way : finding their path trough the tumultuous waters of our mighty Ocean during 3 years and visiting about 150 ports in 27 countries, solely powered by the wind and guided by the stars. The goal was to spread an ecological...

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She navigates the world and sees it changing

Climate change is, indeed, one of the greatest challenges we, Pacificans, have to face… Jenna Ishii did experience it in real life, while she was sailing on Hokule’a, the double-hulled traditional sailing Polynesian (Hawaiian) vaka. Member of the Polynesian voyaging society, she engaged in the journey as a apprentice navigator.   During the seafaring, she noticed how the weather conditions were quite harsh. According to Radio New-Zealand, she reported, in her own words : “Once we left the Pacific, everything changed, and all the forecasts were changing with us. Because it was one of the hottest years with El nino...

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